How a relaunched RedSeal wants to better secure your network

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RedSeal and its CEO, Ray Rothrock, want to go beyond giving organizations the knowledge of where network weaknesses lie.

With the public and private sectors’ heightened focus on cybersecurity, cybersecurity certification company RedSeal is re-releasing its advanced analytics platform that will allow organizations not only identify weak points, but also create an interactive model of agency networks and better prioritize fixes.

“The essence of a good company, especially in the ever-changing field of technology, is to provide innovative solutions that meet not only the current market needs but those that are still over the horizon,” Rothrock said. “I’m proud to say that RedSeal exceeds that high bar, and that’s why I’m so committed to its future.”

RedSeal
A screenshot of RedSeal’s Control Center Security Index. (RedSeal)

RedSeal’s newly expanded platform not only measures vulnerable points on existing networks, but it also takes into account an organization’s use of cloud and mobile technologies. The security index will help agencies better secure public and private cloud instances, integrating with Amazon Web Services and VMWare’s vShield.

On top of network intelligence, the platform measures other instances of security products to determine if they are installed correctly while prioritizing what remediation or fixes should be instantly deployed.

This re-tooled security risk management software is part of a greater relaunch from the company, which announced a $17 million round of funding Monday from a host of companies and venture capital firms. Already backed by a number of firms, including In-Q-Tel, RedSeal’s service is used in a host of large federal agencies, including the Defense Department, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Postal Service, and various places in the intelligence community.

“The network is the lifeblood between IT systems and the key security layer in IT. It should come as no surprise that our adversaries won’t hesitate to attack the network itself to siphon data, disrupt services or change the configuration for their own gain,” Cisco Chief Security and Trust Officer John Stewart, who uses RedSeal, said in a release. “Central to effective cybersecurity is knowing that network infrastructure, and having a deep understanding of how it works, how safely configured it is, and what changes are made day to day.”

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Cybersecurity, Tech
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